• Rahul Jauhari

Updated: May 8, 2020


Mum tigers are fascinating to watch. Unlike males, they are watchful, wary and fiercely protective when it comes to the cubs. October, 2016. we chanced upon her highness.

The Tiger Tank female, as she was known in the jungles of Kabini, was out for a stroll with her three cubs. This was the lady who changed the reputation of a forest that was previously known for leopards, The cubs, like her, were bold enough to walk around in the open. Watching a tigress with her cubs is a lesson in itself. While we greedily lapped up every second of that sighting, the nonchalant mum, once in a while, looked back sternly just to make sure we were a safe distance from her kids.


Featured above:

Indian Tigress with cubs | Binomial name: Panthera tigris


Image captured in Kabini forest, Karnataka, India.

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  • Rahul Jauhari

Updated: May 8, 2020



Among the Toda people in the Nilgiris, there goes a story that explains the origin of the white wing patches on the Pied bushchat.

A dairy priest called Piu.f was busy churning milk In a hurry to fetch water from a stream, apparently he forgot to remove the churning stick from the milk. The Pied bushchat tried to block his path. But Piu.f ignored it and flicked off butter from his hands. While Piu.f met his death, the butter left white spots on the Bushchat’s wings: spots that we see even today. (source: wikipedia)

Well that's how legends roll.


Featured above:

Pied bushchat (male) | Binomial name: Saxicola caprata


Image captured in Munnar, Kerala, India.

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  • Rahul Jauhari

Updated: May 8, 2020


Colonel Samuel Richard Tickell was born in Cuttack in 1811, studied in England and subsequently returned to India at the age of nineteen to serve in the Bengal Native Infantry.

But more significant than his direct work was his contribution to India’s ornithology and mammalogy. Writing under the pen names ‘Old log’ and “Ornithognomon,’ Colonel Tickell contributed to the Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal.


Unfortunately, an eye inflammation eventually robbed of him of his sight, forcing him to abandon his ongoing work titled “Illustrations of Indian Ornithology.”


Prior to his death he donated all his unfinished work to the Zoological Society of London. This covered 488 species of birds, with 276 of them illustrated. His work also covered mammals, insects, reptiles, arachnids and crustaceans.


Featured above:

Tickell’s blue flycatcher | Binomial name: Cyornis tickelliae

A little beauty, duly named after the good colonel, in recognition of his contribution to ornithology in India.


Image captured in Old Magazine House, Ganeshgudi, Karnataka, India.

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